Thursday, July 4, 2013

Happy 4th of July - #4527 - 12 Little Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence, Parts 1 & 2, Chuck Norris, Townhall (2) Reflections on Gettysburg, Townhall

12 Little Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence - Part 1 - Being about a week away from Independence Day, I was doing a little reflecting upon the history surrounding the Declaration of Independence. And I thought it would be of equal interest to many of my readers to look at some often-overlooked aspects of the declaration's production and legacy......1) Benjamin Franklin wrote the first declaration of independence. In April 1775, the Revolutionary War began at Lexington and Concord. On July 5, 1775 -- an entire year before the adoption of the Declaration of Independence -- the Continental Congress adopted the Olive Branch Petition, written by John Dickinson, which appealed directly to British King George III for reconciliation between the Colonies and Great Britain. Though Franklin signed the petition for the sake of consensus, he radically differed with it and said that stronger sentiments were necessary because the petition was destined to be rejected. He was so appalled by British atrocities and exhausted of British rule that he planned the first articles of confederation and drafted a declaration of independence to be issued by none other than Gen. George Washington.  Read more.....


Part 2 - 12 Little Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence, Chuck Norris, Townhall,  There are at least 26 surviving paper copies of the Declaration of Independence of the hundreds made in July 1776 for circulation among the Colonies. After Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, the Committee of Five, which was appointed to write it, was also responsible with overseeing its reproduction for proclamation to those living in the Colonies. The reproduction was done at the shop of Philadelphia printer John Dunlap.......6) When Gen. George Washington read aloud the Declaration of Independence in New York, a riot resulted. History's website explains that by July 9, 1776, a copy of the Declaration of Independence had reached New York City. At the time, tensions about the Revolutionary War ran very high, with Americans split between revolutionists and loyalists. And British naval ships actually occupied New York Harbor at the time. When Washington read the words of the declaration in front of City Hall, a large crowd rallied and cheered. Later that day, they fell a statue of British King George III, melted it down and converted the lead into more than 42,000 musket balls for the Continental Army. Read more........

(2) Reflections on Gettysburg - Townhall - ........... It took eight months to bury the dead. More Americans died on each of the three days of the Battle of Gettysburg than died in the dozen years of the War on Terror. Half the soldiers killed in all American wars since the seventeenth century—about a million in all—died in our civil war. Almost all were of Anglo-Saxon, Scots-Irish, or German-Dutch descent. They were Christians, mostly Protestant with Catholics from Boston and New York City, Savannah and New Orleans thrown in. Slavery ignited the conflagration, but few slave owners fought in the war. General Ulysses S. Grant was one of them; his wife inherited a handful of slaves from her father. Many slave owners, especially the bourbons from the Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi, either hired substitutes or pled their case for staying home based on keeping their slaves from rebelling. Read more..........

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