Thursday, November 8, 2012

Post Election 2012 - #4360 - So What Now? 7 Sets of Questions to Ask After President Obama's Reelection - Joel Rosenberg Blog (2) 25 Million Self-Described "Evangelicals" Voted for Obama, Why and What Else Do the Exit Polls Tell us About How Christians Voted? - Joel Rosenberg

Waking up the day after the 2012 elections, I had many questions on my mind. But none so pressing as this: Is the implosion of America more or less likely now? I’ll share my thoughts on that in a moment.First things first: Many Americans are stunned by President Obama’s reelection. Most prominent conservative analysts and pundits had definitively predicted Romney would win decisively. Several even predicted a landslide for Romney (most notably Dick Morris and George Will and Michael Barone.) Yet in the end, Mr. Obama won 50.3% of the popular vote and 303 electoral votes, while Mr. Romney won 48.1% of the popular vote and only 206 electoral votes. Many evangelical Christians and conservative Catholics are stunned and grieving by the fact that the President’s support for abortion on demand, same-sex marriage, massive deficits and national debt, nationalized health care, and large defense cuts have been ratified by the majority of the American people, as has his policies of appeasing the mullahs in Iran, misreading and mishandling the Arab Spring, and creating distance and daylight between the U.S. and Israel. What’s more, same-sex marriages ballot measures were passed in Maryland and Maine; and marijuana-legalization ballot measures were passed in Washington State and Colorado (in defiance of federal laws prohibiting its use)  Read more........

25 Million Self-Described "Evangelicals" Voted for Obama, Why and What Else Do the Exit Polls Tell Us About How Christians Voted? - Joel Rosenberg ........ 42% of the Protestant Christian vote went for Obama in 2012. This was down from 45% in 2008.  57% of the Protestant Christian vote went for Romney in 2012. This was up from 54% that McCain won in 2008. When you zoom in a bit, you find that 21% of self-identified, white, born-again, evangelical Christians voted for President Obama in 2012. This means of the 117 million people who voted on Tuesday, about 24.7 million were evangelicals who voted for Obama. This was down from 24% of evangelicals who voted for Obama in 2008. (Of the 125 million people who voted in 2008, about 30 million were evangelicals who voted for Obama.) You’d think this decrease in evangelical votes for Obama would have helped win the race for Romney, but it didn’t. 78% of evangelical Christians voted for Romney in 2012. Yes, this was up from the 74% that McCain received in 2008, but it wasn’t nearly enough. To put it more precisely, about 5 million fewer evangelicals voted for Obama in 2012 than in 2008. Meanwhile, some 4.7 million more evangelicals voted for Romney than voted for McCain. Yet Romney still couldn’t win. Meanwhile, 50% of the Catholic vote went for Obama in 2012. This was down from the 54% that Obama won in 2008. 48% of the Catholic vote went for Romney in 2012. This was up from the 45% that McCain won in 2008. Yet it still wasn’t enough. Now consider this additional data: In 2008, white, born-again, evangelical Christians represented 26% of the total vote for president, according to the exit polls. In 2012, white, born-again, evangelical Christians represented 26% of the total vote for president, according to the exit polls. In other words, we saw no change at all in the size of the evangelical vote, –no net gain, certainly no surge, no record evangelical turnout, despite expectations of this. What’s more, in 2008, 27% of the total vote for president was Catholic, according to the exit polls. In 2012, only 25% of the total vote for president was Catholic. Remarkably, this means that Romney got a higher percentage of the Catholic vote than McCain, but millions of fewer Catholics actually voted in 2012, despite having Rep. Paul Ryan, a practicing Catholic, on the ticket. Read more.......

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