Saturday, September 22, 2012

Presidential Election 2012 - #4234 - VIDEOS: Romney Ad: Okay If You Want to Talk About Killing Jobs, Let's Talk About War on Coal - Hot Air (2) Dick Morris: Why the Polls Understate the Romney Vote (3) House Approves 'Stop the War on Coal' Bill in Last Act Before November Election - The Hill

34,090 views 12,184 views -Romney Ads: Okay if You Want to Talk About 'Killing Jobs, Let's Talk about War on Coal - Hot Air - I missed these ads released earlier in the week, but with Ohio and Virginia in play as clutch swing states, ads like these could have some real power in hitting home with those states’ residents. In Ohio especially, people are watching real, productive jobs go by the wayside in real time, thanks to the regulatory noblesse oblige of the Obama administration in directing us lesser coal-consumers towards more acceptable, “sustainable” energy forms. Funny how one of the biggest populist features of the Obama campaign has been showcasing Mitt Romney as a dreaded, greedy ‘factory closer,’ when Mitt Romney’s entire career was spent mastering the creative destruction process that necessitates shutting down enterprises that are costly and uncompetitive, while investing in the ones that could lead to more wealth, lower prices, and more jobs for the economy at large. That is an entirely different endeavor from President Obama’s factory closures, which use regulation and fiat to box out industries that they just don’t like, because they feel like it — ‘necessarily skyrocketing’ energy prices for be damned. President Obama’s war on coal is real. Don’t believe us? Come to Brilliant, Ohio or Clay, West Virginia and we’ll show you coal mines that were closed as a result of President Obama’s assault on hardworking Americans who work in the coal industry.  Read more........

Why the Polls Understate the Romney Vote - Dick Morris - Republicans are getting depressed under an avalanche of polling suggesting that an Obama victory is in the offing. They, in fact, suggest no such thing! Here’s why: 1. All of the polling out there uses some variant of the 2008 election turnout as its model for weighting respondents and this overstates the Democratic vote by a huge margin. In English, this means that when you do a poll you ask people if they are likely to vote. But any telephone survey always has too few blacks, Latinos, and young people and too many elderly in its sample. That’s because some don’t have landlines or are rarely at home or don’t speak English well enough to be interviewed or don’t have time to talk. Elderly are overstated because they tend to be home and to have time. So you need to increase the weight given to interviews with young people, blacks and Latinos and count those with seniors a bit less. Normally, this task is not difficult. Over the years, the black, Latino, young, and elderly proportion of the electorate has been fairly constant from election to election, except for a gradual increase in the Hispanic vote. You just need to look back at the last election to weight your polling numbers for this one.   Read more.........

House Approves 'Stop the War on Coal' Bill in Last Act Before November Election - The Hill -  The House approved a bill Friday morning that would significantly deregulate the coal industry, in a vote that was the last legislative act of the House before the November election. The Stop the War on Coal Act, H.R. 3409, was approved in a 233-175 vote, although as usual, the bill many Democrats described as anti-environmental still found some Democratic support — 19 Democrats voted for it. The legislation is a combination of five bills that would overturn or prevent an array of regulations that Republicans say would harm the coal industry and the economy. Among other things, it would block the Environmental Protection Agency's ability to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and other sources, and prevent rules on the storage and disposal of coal ash and limit Clean Water Act rules.The White House has threatened to veto the bill, arguing it would gut vital protections and presents a false choice between economic growth and public health safeguards. But the veto threat will not be an issue, as the Senate will not consider the bill before it leaves for the election. Still, it provided Republicans an election-season messaging platform to argue that President Obama's environmental policies are bad for the economy.  Read more........


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