Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Presidential Elections 2012 - #4065 - Virginia's Goode Could Be Romney's Undoing - Human Events

AW: THE STATEMENT OF GOODE'S THAT HE DOESN'T CARE IF HE COSTS ROMNEY VIRGINIA'S ELECTORAL VOTES, AND POSSIBLE THE ELECTION IS RECKLESS AND CARELESS. I WISH HE HAD SHOWN THIS MUCH ENERGY AND RESOLVE IN THE HOUSE ELECTION WITH TOM PERRIELLO THAT HE LOST. WHAT A GREAT GIFT THAT 2 YEARS WAS FOR VIRGINIA, HEALTH CARE, RECORD BREAKING STIMULUS BILLS, ETC. PERRIELLO VOTED HOWEVER PELOSI INSTRUCTED HIM. I HOPE GOODE WAKES UP, WE DON'T NEED ANY MORE OF HIS 'GIFTS' FOR VA. AND THE COUNTRY.
While many on the right fear that Constitution Party presidential candidate Virgil Goode might just draw enough votes in his native Virginia to tip the Old Dominion’s 14 electoral votes from Mitt Romney to Barack Obama, the former six-term congressman made it clear he doesn’t care. Goode, in fact, feels that “in many ways, for conservatives, it might be better to have Obama as president next year rather than Romney.” The 65-year-old Goode spoke to Human Events last week as he and his supporters were in the process of gathering the 10,000 signatures they need to submit before the Aug. 24 deadline to qualify for Virginia’s November ballot. Founded by Conservative Caucus chairman and venerable conservative leader Howard Phillips, the Constitution Party is so far on the ballot in 17 states. Right now, Goode told us, the party is making attempts to secure ballot positions in other key states such as Arkansas, Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania — the home state of the Constitution Party’s vice presidential nominee Jim Clymer. But what has clearly set off alarm bells among conservatives lately is the scenario of Goode making the ballot in Virginia — where he won the 5th District U.S. House seat as a Democrat, Independent, and Republican from 1996 until his narrow defeat in 2008. Polls show the state, which Obama narrowly carried over John McCain in 2008, seesawing between the president and his Republican opponent in 2012. A just-completed Quinnipiac Poll showed Obama and Romney tied among likely Virginia voters, with each getting 44 percent — down from Obama’s 47 to 42 percent edge in the same poll in June. Of particular concern to Republicans is Goode’s strength in his home turf: the Danville-Charlottesville area that he represented in Congress and previously as state senator. Four years after he lost the closest House race, the former congressman remains popular in his former turf. In addition, his hard-line stance on immigration, strong emphasis on limited government and focus on following the U.S. Constitution seems more likely to woo Virginians who would otherwise vote for Romney than those inclined to Obama.  Read more..........

No comments:

Post a Comment