Friday, June 22, 2012

Property Rights - #3993 - Rand Paul and John Cornyn Introduce a Bill to Limit Government Eminent Domain - The Blaze (2) Supreme Court Rules Against SEIU - The Blaze

U.S. Sens. John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) introduced legislation today aimed at strengthening private property rights and limiting the government’s power of eminent domain, which allows the seizure private property without the owner’s consent. The Protection of Homes, Small Businesses and Private Property Act of 2012 intentionally coincides with the seventh anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Kelo v. the City of New London in which the Court ruled that local governments could utilize eminent domain to confiscate private property at their discretion. “The Kelo decision represented a vast expansion of government power of eminent domain—one that went too far. My legislation would limit that power and restore the basic protections of private property rights that our founders intended,” Cornyn said in a statement. The bill argues that the “protection of homes, small businesses and other private property rights against government seizures and other unreasonable government interference is a fundamental principal and core commitment of our Nation’s founders.” It also cites the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which states eminent domain may only be used for only for “public use.”  Read more.........


Supreme Court Rules Against SEIU - The Blaze - The Supreme Court announced Thursday its opinion in the Knox v. Service Employees International Union (SEIU) case, ruling that the First Amendment gives state employees the right to decline to pay dues used for political advocacy by the union. More specifically, unions in California can no longer force non-union state workers to finance political campaigns. And now the legal precedent has been set. But how did the SEIU get away with charging non-members in the first place? Red State explains: In California, public workers are not required to join a union. Those that do not are assessed a “fair share fee,” usually a payroll deduction remitted to the union for representing their interests in certain areas. The fee assessed is a percentage of the amount charged a union member.  Read more......

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